Regional Scale Groundwater Study

Renfrew County - Mississippi - Rideau


A groundwater study has recently been conducted.  The goals of this work were to:
  • develop a database and GIS as an aid to analysis, interpretation, and management
  • undertake a regional water balance
  • map aquifers locations, recharging/discharging areas, flow systems, and quality conditions
  • assess surface water quality
  • inventory groundwater users and assess the demand on aquifers
  • map areas where aquifers are susceptible to contamination
  • identify known and potential contaminant sources
  • identify guidelines (all three levels of government) and regulations to protect groundwater
The study can be viewed from the following website,

www.mvc.on.ca/rmrgroundwaterstudy/index.html


With respect to the Tay River watershed, the following comments can be made:
  • Precambrian rock is the main aquifer in the watershed, and vertical fractures predominate
  • sedimentary rocks are more common in the east, with horizontal fractures and horizontal bedding planes
  • Precambrian rock aquifers are more susceptible to potential contamination since the majority of the area has shallow (<2 m) overburden
  • groundwater discharge (baseflow) provides most of the water to streams during the summer and winter months and, thus, has an important role in sustaining natural habitats
  • esker-like overburden deposits in areas of high elevation may act as sources of groundwater recharge
  • the most common water problems result from chloride and nitrate contamination
  • 61% of Lanark County residents use groundwater for drinking, compared with 23% in the larger study area
  • the total volume of groundwater taken (permits +) is less than 2% of what is potentially available from recharge
  • known contaminant sources include petroleum products, chlorinated solvents, landfill leachate, and septic tanks
  • provincial regulations at the present time do not provide clear authority for a municipality to control or protect groundwater

 
contact Friends of the Tay Watershed